#FEESMUSTFALL and not being a sneering whitey.

24 Oct
October 24, 2015

(First Note: This is going to be completely meaningless to my international audience. Feel free to skip it. Video games and tomfoolery will resume in short order. 😉 )

(Second Note: Racist shit in the comments will be terminated with extreme prejudice, be warned.)

The Facebook comments I’ve been seeing around the #FEESMUSTFALL movement have annoyed me enough to write a blog post. It’s a difficult, emotionally-charged topic, and as a middle-class white male, I’m not the best person to speak on it. So I may put my foot in it.

But regardless, here goes.

Fellow white people, could we stop with the “well, just vote for someone other than the ANC, then, duh!” comments. Please.

What do you expect, really? Do you think the black majority really sees a good, effective alternative at this point?

The DA is seen as the “white party”, regardless of who they elect as their “face”, and what white people did to black people in this country destroyed any possibility of majority trust in even the hint of “white rule” for the next few generations. That’s just reality. We white folk have no one but ourselves and our ancestors to blame for that.

And the other parties are small and fairly ineffective.

So what good alternatives are there? It’s easy to say “oh, they’re just stupid, why don’t they vote for someone else” as a white person, but I’m not the first generation in my family to be born free of slavery. I don’t have those scars etched into my soul.

The ANC, flawed as it is, is the political center of the movement that freed non-white people from bondage in SA. When it starts to lose its moral compass, its supporters are entitled to first try to reform it from within, give it a course correction, before they just discard their allegiance.

If you want to reform politics, support measures to broaden access to education for all. An educated populace is better at holding politicians accountable and less prone to believing exaggerated political promises.

Give those kids credit where it’s due. They marched on Luthuli House. They’re dissatisfied with their elected politicians and are organizing to hold them accountable. That’s an extremely positive thing, and could help bring about reform in the long run.

We need more of this, sure, but it’s a great start. Nourish that seed with your support, not sneering and ignorance. Change takes time, be patient and understanding.

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